Voicethread for Multi-sensory Learning and Sharing

Voicethread is a communication and presentation platform that provides a multi-sensory learning experience for users as they learn and share information. Voicethread presentations allow users to create slides that include images, webcam video, and voiced audio with the capability for webcam comments to be added and seen right in the presentation. Voicethread can be accessed from computers, tablets, and mobile devices.

Voicethread is a great learning medium in the classroom as it provides a collaborative learning environment. Students can join a teacher’s “group” or “class” to easily access Voicethread presentations. In addition, presentations can be shared as a link, embedded on a web page, or posted on Facebook or Twitter. With a premium membership presentations can be exported to a file. Privacy settings on presentations allow users to control who can view and comment on a presentation. Students do not need an account to view a Voicethread presentation, yet require an account to comment.

Aside from teacher’s using Voicethread to teach content to students, there are many uses in the classroom. A few are discussed below.

Reflection

Using Voicethread, students can improve metacognition and make meaning of their learning by reflecting upon the process, content, and coursework. Students can answer the teacher’s reflection questions as they develop their Voicethread, or they can finish sentences provided by the teacher such as, “As I read, I was most surprised by…”

Communication

Voicethread allows students and teachers to communicate via comments posted on a Voicethread presentation. Comments can be added to individual slides, allowing for specific feedback to be given and may be posted as video, audio, or text. This facilitates a collaborative learning environment, as students can construct and express knowledge through meaningful comments posted on a Voicethread presentation. Not only can students communicate with students in other classrooms, but they can easily communicate with students in other schools. Such a capability makes it a great medium for learning different perspectives and for research projects focused on geography.

Collaboration

Student groups can work together to create a unified Voicethread presentation. Working as a unit, groups select the media necessary to successfully share their knowledge. Communication and executive functioning skills will be developed as a group makes decisions and develops their plans for creating their Voicethread presentation.

Journal

Throughout a unit or semester students can add slides to their Voicethread, documenting their knowledge and thoughts during the learning process. This can act as a future resource for review and contemplation as the student looks to apply learning while also providing the student and teacher with indicators of growth.

How have you used Voicethreading in your classroom?

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Creating Knowledge as Student Authors

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The use of search engines has made it easy for us all to consume knowledge as they have streamlined the process of finding valid and reliable information online. However, consuming knowledge is only half of the picture. By helping students become authors in the classroom they are learning more about the other part of the process- creating knowledge.

An engaging way to do this is by providing students with the opportunity to create and share their own comics online. This active learning experience switches their role from knowledge consumer to knowledge creator while helping them construct their own knowledge. Furthermore, students are learning how to use the 21st century skills of communication, information literacy, and creativity & innovation. Below are a few comic book creators that can be used in the classroom.

  1. Make Beliefs Comix (Free)

Make Beliefs Comix is an easy to navigate website that has made the comic creation process simple. Comics are 2-4 panels long and include backgrounds, characters, objects, talk and thought balloons, and panel prompts. One great feature about this comic book creator is the detailed artwork available for use. Editing features for objects in panels include moving, resizing, flipping, layering, and deleting.

When comics are completed they can be saved as an image file, printed, or sent by email. Since there is no login for this site comics are not saved and therefore are not accessible once the window is closed.

The Make Beliefs Comix website offers various resources to teachers including lesson plans, a list of ways to use the site in the classroom, story ideas, writing prompts, and language options. There are also pages with information about how Make Beliefs Comix may be used in ESOL/Literacy and special needs classrooms.

Make Beliefs Comix is available free online and as a free or paid app. Here is a short video tutorial.

2. Pixton 

Pixton provides many customization options to users. Students can add and customize full color characters, down to how the character’s hand is positioned and the expression on the character’s face. Preset background images can be edited by selecting the color and gradient used in the image. Speech bubbles can be a variety of shapes allow layering options and props can be added to panels.

When finished comics can be printed, saved as a file, embedded, or shared on the web. Once submitted comics can be graded using a 5 point rating system or a built in rubric. There are opportunities for students to view their classmates comics on the site, with options for providing comments. There are opportunities for self-reflection and peer reviews with the format of the site. Pixton offers lesson plans in a variety of content areas and discusses the implications of using Pixton for second language acquisition.

With the teacher accounts students do not need to create a login, and students are added to one of the teacher’s groups or classes. The teacher and school accounts allow comics to be created in a private and secure space. The teacher account is free to try and has a monthly subscription, whereas the school or district account is a one year paid subscription. There is a free account, however, there are many features like privacy and grading options not available on this type of account. Pixton is available online and as an app. Below is a Pixton video overview.

3. ToonDoo

ToonDoo offers a nice balance between customization and ease of use. Comics can use horizontal or vertical layouts of 1-4 panels. Characters are mainly cartoons that offer multiple poses per character. Students are also able to create their own characters, editing emotion, physical features, stance, and clothing. These characters can be added to their gallery and comics. There are different text options, as well as a variety of props and backgrounds. Two additional features of this cartoon creator are that uploaded images can be and drawings can be added to comics. Editing features allow students to size, clone, flip, rotate, and layer objects.

When comics are completed they can be published on the ToonDoo website for everyone to see, associated with a title, description, and tags. Other options include keeping it private or sharing via email with friends.

Much like Pixton, a free version of the website is available to those who register. This version, however does not offer the same privacy and sharing options as the paid version called ToonDoo Spaces which uses a social media network format to feature cartoons. This version only allows students and educators to create and access content, site administrators monitor and manage content, and students do not need to register with an email. A free trial is available for ToonDoo Spaces.

Have you used any of these or other comic creator sites in your classroom? I would love to hear how! Please share as a comment!

3 Benefits of Technology in the Classroom

http://www.schooltechnology.org

Technology integration is a buzzword in education right now- and has been for a few years. The way we live our lives is changing due to technology, and so is the way we are teaching. Here are a few benefits of technology use in the classroom.

Constructivist Learning

One benefit of using technology in the classroom is that it allows students to construct their own knowledge as they take problem solving into their own hands. Rather than being passive listeners, students are actively using their 21st century skills of accessing, evaluating, and applying information. Whether they are using tablets, computers, or cell phones students are learning to use these tools as consumers and producers of information. An important lifelong skill for many professions today.

Differentiated Learning

As educators, we know how individual the learning process can be for students. Technology provides students and teachers with more resources and tools to meet diverse needs. Using technology resources in the classroom also helps diverse learners succeed by providing multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement- helping teachers align their lessons with the principles of Universal Design for Learning.

Collaborative Learning

As we know, it is important to have strong communication and problem solving skills. There are many technology resources that provide students with the opportunity to learn and share online. Google Drive allows students to work on the same document simultaneously while chatting about ideas and feedback. The website epals.com connects classrooms around the country as they complete research projects together. Collaborative learning websites foster skills that help prepare students for college and career.

As we can see there are great benefits to using technology in the classroom. However, it is important to remember that technology is constantly evolving and changing. Thankfully, there are excellent resources available to teachers online including websites like edutopia.org and iste.org that provide information from researchers, teachers, and writers in the field of educational technology.

Resources:

http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/whatisudl/3principles